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Articles related to well said

Book 3: Chapter 13 - Le Morte D'Arthur - Sir Thomas Malory
What, said King Pellinore, will ye not fight for her? No, sir, said the knight, I will not fight with such a knight of prowess as ye be. Well, said Pellinore, ye say well;  ...
http://classiclit.about.com/library/bl-etexts/tmalory/bl-tmalory-morte-3-13.htm
Book 1: Chapter 20 - Le Morte D'Arthur - Sir Thomas Malory
Therewith he started unto the king's horse and mounted into the saddle, and said, Gramercy, this horse is my own. Well, said the king, thou mayst take my horse ...
http://classiclit.about.com/library/bl-etexts/tmalory/bl-tmalory-morte-1-20.htm
Book 4: Chapter 11 - Le Morte D'Arthur - Sir Thomas Malory
THEN Sir Accolon bethought him, and said, Woe worth this sword, for by it have I got my death. It may well be, said the king. Now, sir, said Accolon, I will tell you; ...
http://classiclit.about.com/library/bl-etexts/tmalory/bl-tmalory-morte-4-11.htm
Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde, Chapter 1 - Robert Louis Stevenson
`Indeed' said Mr Utterson, with a slight change of voice, `and what was that?' ` Well, it was' this way,' returned Mr Enfield: `I was coming home from some place at ...
http://classiclit.about.com/library/bl-etexts/rlstevenson/bl-rlstevenson-drjek1.htm
Book 2: Chapter 3 - Le Morte D'Arthur - Sir Thomas Malory
The name of it, said the lady, is Excalibur, that is as much to say as Cut-steel. Ye say well, said the king; ask what ye will and ye shall have it, an it lie in my power  ...
http://classiclit.about.com/library/bl-etexts/tmalory/bl-tmalory-morte-2-3.htm
Book 7: Chapter 35 - Le Morte D'Arthur - Sir Thomas Malory
I will well, said Sir Gareth, that ye have this office, and it were better. Then came in Sir Persant of Inde, with an hundred knights with him, and there he did ...
http://classiclit.about.com/library/bl-etexts/tmalory/bl-tmalory-morte-7-35.htm
King Arthur - The Beginning Of The Reading Time - Classic Literature
"'I will well,' said Arthur, and rode fast after the sword, and when he came home, the lady and all were out to see the jousting. Then was Arthur wroth and said to ...
http://classiclit.about.com/od/kingarthur/a/King-Arthur-The-Beginning-Of-The-Reading-Time_2.htm
22 - Kidnapped - Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894)
"Well, then, east, ye see, we have the muirs," said Alan. "Once there, David, it's mere pitch-and-toss. Out on yon bald, naked, flat place, where can a body turn to ?
http://classiclit.about.com/library/bl-etexts/rlstevenson/bl-rlst-kid-22.htm
18 - Kidnapped - Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894)
"Well," said he, "yon was a hot burst, David." I said nothing, nor so much as lifted my face. I had seen murder done, and a great, ruddy, jovial gentleman struck ...
http://classiclit.about.com/library/bl-etexts/rlstevenson/bl-rlst-kid-18.htm
19 - Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855) - Classic Literature
"Well, and you want your fortune told?" she said, in a voice as decided as her glance, as harsh as her features. "I don't care about it, mother; you may please ...
http://classiclit.about.com/library/bl-etexts/cbronte/bl-cbronte-jan-19.htm
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